top of page
  • Writer's pictureMoney Mentor

How much is a women's full State Pension?

The State Pension is a critical source of income for individuals who have reached the state retirement age. The amount of the State Pension a woman receives is determined by several factors, such as their National Insurance contributions and any additional state pension they may have accumulated. In this blog, we will discuss how much a woman's full State Pension is and the factors that determine it.

How much is a women's full State Pension?

Recommended Making Money Books



How much is a women's full State Pension?


As of 2021-2022, the full new State Pension for an individual is £179.60 per week. However, this is the maximum amount that someone can receive, and not everyone will receive the full amount. To be eligible for the full new State Pension, a woman must have at least 35 years of National Insurance contributions.


The amount of the State Pension that someone receives depends on their National Insurance contributions. National Insurance contributions are paid by individuals and employers, and they contribute towards the cost of certain state benefits, including the State Pension. Individuals can earn credits towards their National Insurance contributions, for example, if they are unemployed or caring for children or elderly relatives.


To receive the new State Pension, a woman must have at least ten years of National Insurance contributions. If a woman has between ten and 35 years of contributions, she will receive a pro-rata amount of the full new State Pension, based on the number of years of contributions she has made.


For example, if a woman has made 20 years of National Insurance contributions, she will receive 20/35ths of the full new State Pension. This means that she will receive a weekly amount of £102.34. The exact amount of the pro-rata pension will depend on the number of years of contributions that the woman has made.


In addition to the basic State Pension, some women may be entitled to an additional state pension, such as the State Second Pension or the SERPS (State Earnings-Related Pension Scheme). These additional pensions are based on a woman's earnings and National Insurance contributions and are paid on top of the basic State Pension. However, the State Second Pension and SERPS were abolished for individuals reaching state pension age on or after 6 April 2016.


It is also essential to note that a woman's State Pension age may have changed over the years. Women born before 6 April 1950 had a State Pension age of 60. However, changes to the State Pension age mean that women born after 5 April 1950 will have a later State Pension age. For example, women born between 6 April 1950 and 5 December 1953 will have a State Pension age of between 60 and 65. Women born after 6 December 1953 will have a State Pension age of 66 or above.


To check your State Pension age, you can use the government's online calculator. This calculator will also provide an estimate of the amount of State Pension that you may be entitled to based on your National Insurance contributions.


In conclusion, the amount of a woman's full State Pension depends on various factors, including their National Insurance contributions, any additional state pension they may have accumulated, and their State Pension age.


To receive the full new State Pension, a woman must have at least 35 years of National Insurance contributions. If a woman has made between ten and 35 years of contributions, she will receive a pro-rata amount of the full new State Pension.


Additionally, some women may be entitled to an additional state pension based on their earnings and contributions. To check your State Pension age and estimate the amount of State Pension that you may be entitled to, you can use the government's online calculator. It is essential to plan ahead and consider your State Pension income when planning for retirement to ensure financial stability in your later years.



Related Content



4 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All
bottom of page