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State Pension

The State pension, or “new” State pension as it is now called, was changed on 6th April 2016 in an attempt at making it simpler than the old system.

It is based on your National Insurance (NI) contributions record, and to be eligible for the full amount (currently £175 per week), you’ll need to have made 35 qualifying years of contributions.

Even after you have reached 35 years of contributions, you will still pay NI until you reach your State pension age.

If you don’t achieve more than ten qualifying years of contributions, you will not receive the new State pension.

 

If you build up between ten and 35 qualifying years, you should get a proportionate amount compared to whatever the full amount is at the time, for example, 20 qualifying years should get 20/35 of the full amount.

It should be noted, that the new State pension is only designed to be a starting point for pension savings, and that other savings vehicles must also be used, in order to secure a more comfortable retirement.

TIP: Women who cannot work because they are raising a family, are entitled to pension credits for the years they look after their children. Make sure you register and claim your entitlement.