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Money etiquette 

And finally, it is also worth just mentioning “money etiquette”, and how to behave, or not behave as the case may be, whether you have lots of money or nothing at all.

Discussions about money can be awkward to say the least, sometimes a little frightening and sometimes quite embarrassing. It can also be very divisive, between the “haves”, and “have nots”, so here are five Do’s, and five Do not’s, to help you deal with the delicate subject of money etiquette.

Do:

  1. Try to keep yourself grounded if your family is well off, and you benefit from this with lavish gifts, and all the up to date new gadgets you could wish for. Boasting about how rich you are, where you live, what your horse's name is, what you drive, and how many new things you have, is a sure-fire way of becoming very unpopular, very quickly.

  2. Pay back any money you borrow from a friend, as quickly as you can. But see No1. Below.

  3. Have conversations with your immediate family about money and finance, as it will help you learn and understand more.

  4. Offer help and guidance to friends, but ONLY if they ask for it. You shouldn’t force your frugal & thrifty thoughts and opinions on others uninvited.

  5. Keep positive to the outside world and friends, even if you have no money. You don’t want friends to be too embarrassed to invite you out, because they think you can’t afford it.      

Do not:

  1. Borrow money from friends. They won’t stay friends for long if you don’t pay them back quickly.

  2. Lend money to friends. If they can’t pay you back, they will end up hiding from you, avoiding your calls, and eventually no longer being your friend.

  3. Moan about money and financial problems to anyone outside of your immediate family, and most certainly not to people and friends who you know have less money than you.

  4. Ask a friend how much money they have, or what they earn. It’s just not polite.

  5. Show off your new gadgets. This can cause jealousy and envy, and may even result in you losing your new objects, through theft or horseplay.    

 

As can be seen, discussing money at the wrong time, in the wrong place, or with the wrong attitude, can create tensions.

 

But if you follow the rules of money etiquette as set out above, then you shouldn’t go far wrong, and your relationships with family, friends, and work colleagues, as well as your social life, will be much better off for it.